Neal Kaplan I'm a director of technical communications working for a data analysis startup in Redwood City. I started as a technical writer, and since then I've also been learning about information architecture, training, content strategy, and even something about customer support. I'm also passionate about cross-team collaboration and user communities.

What words besides I Should you avoid using on a resume?

2 min read

“responsible for,” “oversight,” and “duties included” are unnecessarily complicated and hide your experience. “Be direct, concise, and use active verbs to describe your accomplishments,” said Alyssa Gelbard, founder and president of Résumé Strategists.

What words should not be used in a resume?

Don’t use phrases that have lost their meaning, like “hard worker,” “motivated,” or “go-getter”. They won’t help you stand out from the crowd. Business school jargon like “results oriented,” “best of breed,” or “wheelhouse” should be avoided.

What are 3 things you should not put on your resume?

  • Too much info.
  • There is a wall of text
  • There are spelling mistakes.
  • There are misrepresentations about your qualifications.
  • Personal information is unneeded.
  • Your age.
  • There are negative comments about a previous employer.
  • There are details about your interests.

If you don’t include unnecessary or controversial elements in your resume, you’ll have a better chance of being invited for an interview. If you include the details of every job you have had, the important information could become less visible, so focus on the skills you have that make you a good candidate for the role you want.

A well- structured resume is easier to read and draws a hiring manager’s eye to your most job-relevant skills so that they can see at a glance whether you are an appropriate candidate Bullet points are an effective way to highlight your key abilities visually, and the format makes a series of direct links between the job description and your experience. To improve the chances of your resume scoring well, use the same terms as they have in their job description and don’t include anything that an automated system won’t pick up as text.

Changing the structure and adding new text on your resume can lead to errors if you are applying for several jobs and tailoring your resume to each of them. It’s easier to spot errors on the screen if you print out your resume. Even if you don’t meet all the criteria, a hiring manager will still consider you if you have the right attitude.

The information on your resume that is most relevant to the job is the things that make you a great employee. Unless your family situation is related to your application, religious beliefs or political leanings should be left out and focused on the professional skills that make you a good candidate.

People used to include their birth date on their resume, but now it is acceptable to exclude references to your age as much as possible. When writing your resume, don’t mention why you left a job or why you’re unhappy with your current position.

With the increasing focus on work-life balance and the need for downtime, including some details of your interests and hobbies is expected. Even the most relevant hobbies or interests should only make up a few lines of your resume and you should avoid including anything that might undermine your application.

If you want to avoid using references to yourself in your resume, use the first-person language “I,” “we” or “me” instead.

What can I use instead of I on a resume?

The use of the word “I” in a resume and cover letter is redundant. It can be replaced with action sentences.

Should you use the pronoun I in a resume?

A resume is written without a topic. It’s never a good idea to use “I,” “me,” or “ours” in a resume. Instead, you start with the action, such as writing a resume for professionals looking for a change.

Neal Kaplan I'm a director of technical communications working for a data analysis startup in Redwood City. I started as a technical writer, and since then I've also been learning about information architecture, training, content strategy, and even something about customer support. I'm also passionate about cross-team collaboration and user communities.

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